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A Comparison of Static Form Providers

A Comparison of Static Form Providers

This article was originally published on CSS-Tricks.

Let’s attempt to coin a term here: “Static Form Provider.” You bring your HTML <form>, but don’t worry about the back-end processing that makes it work. There are a lot of these services out there!

Static Form Providers do all tasks like validating, storing, sending notifications, and integrating with other APIs. It’s lovely when you can delegate big responsibilities like this. The cost? Typically a monthly or annual subscription, except for a few providers and limited plans. The cost is usually less than fancier “form builders“ that help you build the form itself and process it.

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My favorite Netlify features

My favorite Netlify features

Being a JAMstack developer in 2019 makes me feel like I am living in a wonderland. All these modern frameworks, tools, and services make our lives as JAMstack developers quite enjoyable. In fact, Chris would say they give us superpowers.

Yet, there is one particular platform that stands out with its formidable products and features—Netlify. You’re probably pretty well familiar with Netlify if you read CSS-Tricks regularly. There’s a slew of articles on it. There are even two CSS-Tricks microsites that use it.

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How to add a contact form to a static website

How to add a contact form to a static website

With the rise of the static site, developers need a service that could handle forms. Static website contact form is the most common case, and in this article, you would learn how to add one with Kwes form builder.

Adding a contact form to a static site could be a challenge because the static site usually doesn’t have a backend that could handle the form submissions. In that case, we could use a service that would do this for us. There are many services out there, like Netlify forms or Typeform, but in this case, we are going to use the Kwes service.

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Oh, the Many Ways to Make Triangular Breadcrumb Ribbons!

Oh, the Many Ways to Make Triangular Breadcrumb Ribbons!

This article was originally published on CSS-Tricks.

Let’s have a look at how we can create a row of links that sorta run into each other with a chevron-like shape and notch on each block like you might see in a hierarchical breadcrumb navigation.

You’ve probably seen this pattern a lot. It comes up often in things like multi-step forms and site breadcrumbs. For our purposes we’re going to call these “ribbons” so we know what we’re referring to as we go.

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5 things to consider when creating your CSS style guide

5 things to consider when creating your CSS style guide

This article was originally published on LogRocket Blog.

A CSS style guide is a set of standards and rules on how to use and write CSS code. It often contains global branding definitions like colors and typography and a set of reusable components for building a more consistent and maintainable project.

CSS style guides should be considered an equal citizen of every project requirement.

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Bookmarks, Saves, Hearts, Stars, Claps

Bookmarks, Saves, Hearts, Stars, Claps

I realized that I rarely use bookmarks, but I still bookmark interesting sites, projects, or tools. I guess this is because my browser is displaying bookmarked pages first in the suggestions which could be very useful when you know only part of the title or a domain.

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Introducing SPRO

Introducing SPRO

SPRO (pronounces /es-pro/), or Starter Project CLI, is the best starting point for your next project. SPRO aims to set up a perfect development environment by learning about your project architecture and then setting up Gulp tasks for all your needs.

It is very flexible, and it could save you a vast amount of time that you usually spend on configuring your project.

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Overview of Popular Static Site Generators

Overview of Popular Static Site Generators

This article was originally published on Toptal Blog.

All static page generators have a single and seemingly straightforward task: to produce a static HTML file and all its assets.

There are many obvious benefits to serving a static HTML file, such as easier caching, faster load times, and a more secure environment overall. Each static page generator produces the HTML output differently.

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My first year of freelancing

My first year of freelancing

I am writing this article from a frontend developer perspective, as I am one. I have specialized in User Interface, Static Page Generators, WordPress, and page speed optimization.

About a year ago, I started with a freelance career. This experience has changed me as a professional, but also as a person.

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From WordPress to Hexo

From WordPress to Hexo

This article was originally published on Toptal Blog.

Static site generators are systems that compile templates into static HTML pages. If that sounds efficient—yes, it is. There is no server processing or rendering, so static websites tend to be very fast and lightweight, saving you and your users precious time and bandwidth. This increased efficiency is reflected in lower costs and, potentially, higher revenues.

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Fixing Google Analytics caching issue

Fixing Google Analytics caching issue

Getting the perfect score from Google PageSpeed Insights could be a tedious task, especially if Google Analytics is present on the website. You end up thinking that 99/100 is the perfect score. What does that one point mean anyway? And you go to sleep every night knowing that one point is still missing. My friend, the solution is here.

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How to create crooked shadow

How to create crooked shadow

Recently I was working on a very interesting and challenging project. I was told to use CSS wherever possible. That was actually the first time I’ve heard someone says those words and my heart was full of joy. One of the most challenging features to build was to add a shadow on a crooked border. I know it doesn’t sound either glamorous or complicated, but it kinda is.

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_bem - WordPress theme with BEM methodology

_bem - WordPress theme with BEM methodology

BEM is great. It is simple, yet powerful. If you’re not familiar with it, I highly recommend reading this article by Harry Roberts.

In short, it is a CSS naming convention methodology. It stands for: block, element, modifier. Blocks are parent components, elements are child components and modifiers are different states of components.

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CSS sidebar toggle

CSS sidebar toggle

CSS sidebar toggle presented in this post is made with CSS only. These days accessibility is pretty important stuff and, because changing the state of the elements cannot be done without JavaScript, I’ve added a small snippet for this feature.

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Angular dragtable

Angular dragtable

Angular dragtable is an Angular directive that allows table column reorder.

I’ve been searching for a similar solution, including JavaScript libraries, jQuery plugins or Angular directives. I’ve tested various solutions, but nothing worked as expected. So I decided to create brand new directive.

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Recursively includible Angular directive

Recursively includible Angular directive

I’ve been working on a complex Angular CRUD-ish project recently and one of the requirements was to create a form based on an MVC model. This model was not definite and could vary depending on many parameters in the application. As a result, I’ve created a directive that could generate a form for every complex model. Final code is available on Github repository and it’s called angular-repeater. Demo is available here.

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How to automate development with Atom

How to automate development with Atom

We should automate our development process whenever possible. But there are so many tools available and new ones are published every week. Even though these tools help us, it could be very time consuming to learn and to handle all of these tools.

In this post I’ll show you how to automate development process using only Atom packages.

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CSS tabs, part II: Accessibility

CSS tabs, part II: Accessibility

Recently I’ve been writing about CSS tabs. Topic was surprisingly popular, gaining several thousand users to my page.

What was even more surprising were comments about accessibility. Although my initial idea was to present just a CSS technique for tabs, I decided to investigate a little bit more and add accessibility to my solution.

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Perfect local server with Atom

Perfect local server with Atom

I’ve been using all kind of local server solutions back in a day, from WampServer to Vagrant. I noticed that I had to spend large amount of time on learning and configuration. That was, not only time consuming, but also very frustrating, especially when you’re a newby and you don’t understand half of the instructions and problems.

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