Tag: spg

A Comparison of Static Form Providers

A Comparison of Static Form Providers

This article was originally published on CSS-Tricks.

Let’s attempt to coin a term here: “Static Form Provider.” You bring your HTML <form>, but don’t worry about the back-end processing that makes it work. There are a lot of these services out there!

Static Form Providers do all tasks like validating, storing, sending notifications, and integrating with other APIs. It’s lovely when you can delegate big responsibilities like this. The cost? Typically a monthly or annual subscription, except for a few providers and limited plans. The cost is usually less than fancier “form builders“ that help you build the form itself and process it.

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My favorite Netlify features

My favorite Netlify features

Being a JAMstack developer in 2019 makes me feel like I am living in a wonderland. All these modern frameworks, tools, and services make our lives as JAMstack developers quite enjoyable. In fact, Chris would say they give us superpowers.

Yet, there is one particular platform that stands out with its formidable products and features—Netlify. You’re probably pretty well familiar with Netlify if you read CSS-Tricks regularly. There’s a slew of articles on it. There are even two CSS-Tricks microsites that use it.

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Overview of Popular Static Site Generators

Overview of Popular Static Site Generators

This article was originally published on Toptal Blog.

All static page generators have a single and seemingly straightforward task: to produce a static HTML file and all its assets.

There are many obvious benefits to serving a static HTML file, such as easier caching, faster load times, and a more secure environment overall. Each static page generator produces the HTML output differently.

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From WordPress to Hexo

From WordPress to Hexo

This article was originally published on Toptal Blog.

Static site generators are systems that compile templates into static HTML pages. If that sounds efficient—yes, it is. There is no server processing or rendering, so static websites tend to be very fast and lightweight, saving you and your users precious time and bandwidth. This increased efficiency is reflected in lower costs and, potentially, higher revenues.

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